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Paperbacks

Due for publication November 2019

The cover of The Tudor Court

The Tudor Court

†David Loades  

ISBN 978 1 85944 986 8

The image to the left is on the front cover of The Tudor Court and is
from The Royal Collection © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

The cover of Geoffrey Chaucer

Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester 1533-1588

Favourite of Elizabeth I

†David Loades    

ISBN 978 1 85944 984 4

The image to the left is on the front cover of Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester 1533-1588 and is
© The National Portrait Gallery,

The cover of Geoffrey Chaucer

Geoffrey Chaucer

 †Norman Blake

ISBN 978 1 85944 987 5

The image to the left is on the front cover of Geoffrey Chaucer and is
© The National Portrait Gallery,

The cover of The Oxford Movement and Anglican Ritualism

The Oxford Movement and Anglican Ritualism

 †Nigel Yates

ISBN 978 1 85944 985 1

The image to the left is on the front cover of The Oxford Movement and Anglican Ritualism and is
© The National Portrait Gallery,

The cover of Thomas Cook of Leicester

Thomas Cook of Leicester

Robert Ingle  

ISBN 978 1 85944 983 7

The image to the left is on the front cover of Thomas Cook of Leicester and is
©The Thomas Cook Company Archive


Twelfth Century History

The cover of Peter Abelard by David Luscombe

Peter Abelard

David Luscombe

ISBN 978-1-85944-183-1

£4.00

Fifteenth Century History

The cover of Warwick the Kingmaker and the Wars of the Roses by David Loades

Warwick the Kingmaker and the Wars of the Roses

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor,
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978-1-85944-236-4

Publ 2014; 2nd printing 2019

£3.00

Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick -Warwick ‘the Kingmaker’ played a key role in the Wars of the Roses. In his lifetime he was known as ‘a proud setter-up and puller down of kings’ but his own political career proved abortive. He was not a great soldier but he was a hard-working administrator and a nobleman of vast possessions and power. His support was vital to the crown and alienating him was a serious matter. After his death at Barnet he was attainted as a traitor. He left no male heir but his two daughters married the brother of Edward IV. Isabel became Duchess of Clarence and Anne married Richard III. It was Isabel’s son, Edward Earl of Warwick who was imprisoned by Henry VII after Bosworth Field and executed in 1499.

The cover of Henry VII The First Tudor King by David Grummitt

Henry VII 1457-1509: the first Tudor king.

David Grummitt

ISBN 978-1-85944-208-1

Publ 2009

£4.99

1485 saw the defeat of Richard III at Bosworth Field and the victory of Henry Tudor who sits uncomfortably between Medieval and early modern history; The author examines the early years of Henry Tudor taking the period to 1487. He moves on to international diplomacy and the threat of Perkin Warbeck. The discussion moves on to administration and government considering Council, parliament finance, law and justice. An equally important section covers the relationship between Henry VII and the nobility, the royal household and the king’s final years. The conclusion considers the concept of Henry VII and ‘New Monarchy.

David Grummitt has written extensively on warfare and government in the Tudor period as well as on the Wars of the Roses and the Lancastrian period 1399-1461. He has taught at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge and the LSE and worked on the History of Parliament Trust. He is currently Head of Humanities at the University of Kent, Canterbury.

The cover of Lords of Renaissance Italy by John Law

Lords of Renaissance Italy

John Law

ISBN 978-1-85944-194-7

£4.00

The cover of The Valois Dukes of Burgundy by Andrew Brown

The Valois Dukes of Burgundy

Andrew Brown

(An Open University Text)

ISBN 978 1 85944 199 2

£5.00

Sixteenth Century History

The cover of Thomas Cromwell by Geoffrey Elton

Thomas Cromwell

†Geoffrey Elton
Preface by †David Loades

ISBN 978 1 85944 299 9

First published in 1991 by Headstart History; reprinted by The Davenant Press 2014

£4.99

Thomas Cromwell was Henry VIII’s ‘man of business’. His early adult life was spent in Europe before he returned to England and entered the service of Cardinal Wolsey who recognised is ability and efficiency in carrying out policy. The fall of Wolsey could have ended his career at court but he survived and established himself as the king’s right-hand man and most importantly at finding a solution to ending Henry’s marriage to Catherine of Aragon enabling him to marry Anne Boleyn. Cromwell was a reformer. His work with the king led to the establishment of parliament’s power and through a series of acts ended papal authority in England and through the Act of Supremacy made Henry VIII head of the Church in England. With Thomas Cranmer becoming the first Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury . Such power brought enemies and for the ‘low born’ Cromwell those enemies included the Duke of Norfolk. The deaths of Anne and Jane Seymour allowed Cromwell to persuade the king to make an unsuccessful marriage to Anne of Cleves. That and the implied changes in foreign policy made it simple for Norfolk and his friends to turn Henry against Cromwell who was condemned to death and executed in 1541. An action which Henry quickly regretted.

Professor Sir Geoffrey Elton spent most of his academic life at Clare College, Cambridge and retired as he was knighted for his services to History and retired as Professor of Constitutional History. Geoffrey Elton believed that all research should start with the documents and amongst his many books The Tudor Constitution remains an invaluable tool. But it was The Tudor Revolution in Government which established Thomas Cromwell as the force behind the changes made between the fall and death Wolsey and Cromwell’s in 1541 and demonstrated that the changes made in the ‘Reformation Parliament reflected the ideas of Cromwell and his influence over Henry VIII.. Ultimately power lay with the king and Cromwell’s death reflected that.

The cover of Sir Francis Walsingham, Spymaster to Elizabeth I by David Loades

Sir Francis Walsingham, Spymaster to Elizabeth I

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor,
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 041 1

£4.00

Sir Francis Walsingham is best known as Elizabeth I's Spymaster General and for the ruthless efficiency with which he carried out that role. Elizabeth did not like him but she valued him and he saw his duty as paramount, however awkward she could be. He was consistently in favour of defending protestants and tracking down catholic conspirators. As Elizabeth's ambassador Walsingham was in France at the time of the St Bartholomew's Day Massacre in 1572 and it was that experience which gave him a lasting hatred of the Catholic Church.

The cover of Cranmer and the English Reformation I by David Loades

Cranmer and the English Reformation

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor,
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 175 6

First published by Headstart History 1991, 2014 4th printing by Davenant Press.

£4.99

Thomas Cranmer was the first Protestant Archbishop of Canterbury. He was consecrated in 1533 and burnt at the stake in Oxford in March 1556. His death, along with Latimer and Ridley is marked by a monument in the city centre. He was not a saint or even great theologian but at a chance meeting with Edward Foxe and Stephen Gardiner both close to Henry VIII that Cranmer put forward an opinion on the King’s ‘great matter’ – how to end his marriage to Catherine of Aragon so he could marry Anne Boleyn.. His views led to his elevation to Canterbury on the death of William Warham.. He remained archbishop under Edward VI and in 1548-9 introduced the First Book of Common Prayer though it was probably the second Prayer Book of 152 which better reflected his views. It was the early death of Edward and accession of the Catholic Mary I which led to his martyrdom. Between 1530-1540 Cranmer created an ecclesiastical polity which suited Tudor monarchy. After Mary’s death she re-established Cranmer’s polity and it was her longevity which guaranteed its security.

View contents & blurb

The cover of Cardinal Wolsey by David Loades

Cardinal Wolsey

c.1472-1530: Tudor Statesman and Chancellor

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor,
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 150 3

Published 2008

£4.99

Wolsey was a great man. He was Henry VIII’s agent but never his friend. He was thirty-seven when Henry became king and fifty-eight when he himself died at Leicester. Wolsey was not original in that foreign policy was that of the king. He loved ostentation but always claimed that it was important to reflect the magnificence of the monarch. Hampton Court and Christ Church, Oxford are examples and both were appropriated by Henry VIII. Wolsey failed the king because he was unable to solve Henry’s marital problems based on the need for a legitimate heir which needed a new and younger queen able to produce the much-needed male heir. But he did indeed solve it by employing and training Thomas Cromwell who was unencumbered by religious attachments and solely concerned to solve ‘the King’s Great Matter’ and introduce practical solutions. Wolsey was despised as ‘low-born’ – ‘a butcher’s son from Ipswich’ by the aristocracy for whom he was easy prey.

View contents & blurb

The cover of Wales in the Sixteenth Century by Glanmor Williams

Wales in the Sixteenth Century

The Reformation in Wales, Wales and the act of Union

†Glanmor Williams. Professor Emeritus,
University of Wales, Swansea

ISBN 978 1 85944 209 8

First published in 1991 by Headstart History as two separate paperbacks and combined by The Davenant Press in 2014.

£4.99

It was not until the reign of Henry VIII that the necessary reforms were made to the Welsh Church. The response was largely muted and the Act of Supremacy accepted. But if there was little opposition to Henry VIII the response to the changes under Edward VI was different. And it was William Salesbury who was chiefly concerned to ensure that the Welsh language should underpin the changes. It was not until the reign of Elizabeth that Whitgift’s encouragement of William Morgan’s Welsh Bible that the language and culture of Wales were preserved.

Before the Act of Union Wales was a land of fragmented authority and weakened by the power of the lords and officials in the Principality and the Marches. Some of these issues were dealt with by Rowland Lee who saw the changes made by Thomas Cromwell as potentially dangerous. The changes are usually seen as essential in the light of the Royal Supremacy. New administrative boundaries were created along with coherent law. It was declared that ‘since the happy incorporation of the Welsh with the English, the history of both nations as well as the people is united’

Glanmor Williams died in 2005. He was a leading figure in the public life of Wales but was also widely regarded as the leading authority of its early modern period on which he published extensively. After graduating from Aberystwyth he was appointed to University of Wales, Swansea. In 1957 he was elected Professor of History and held that post until early retirement in 1982.

The cover of John Foxe: The Book of Martyrs by David Loades

John Foxe: The Book of Martyrs

†David Loades
Director then Literary Director of the British Academy John Foxe Project

ISBN 978 1 85944 241 8

Publ. 2014

£3

In 1571 Convocation decreed that the Acts and Monuments of John Foxe (often referred to now as Foxe’s Book of Martyrs) should be placed in every cathedral church and the houses of cathedral clergy. William Cecil also arranged for it to be placed in every chamber at court. Thus it entered the culture of England and only the English Bible exercised a comparable influence. Foxe was born in Boston Lincolnshire and had strong connections with Magdalen and Brasenose Colleges at Oxford. He may well have been offered the Deanery of Christ Church. He held the Prebendary of Shipton-under-Wychwood near Burford in Oxfordshire. His most powerful patrons were the Dukes of Norfolk.

The cover of Three Tudor Essays by David Loades

Three Tudor Essays

The nobility in the Sixteenth Century
Henry VIII, Thomas Cromwell and the Church
The Crown and the Church in the long Sixteenth Century

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 211 1

Published 2014

£4.99

These essays cover three themes. The first demonstrates the manner in which the aristocracy was weaned away from its military preoccupation to become a civilian and service class. The second deals with the rise and fall of Thomas Cromwell and his relationship with Henry VIII. The third essays starts with Henry VII and shows how Henry VIII, Edward VI and Elizabeth I used the Royal Supremacy to establish secular control over the church in contrast with the earlier period.

The cover of The English Church and the Papacy in the Sixteenth Century by David Loades

The English Church and the Papacy in the Sixteenth Century

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 261 6

Published 2014

£4.99

In the opening years of the sixteenth century relations between the English crown and Rome were calm and amicable. Henry VII was conventionally pious and the papacy was anxious for his political support. But the need for an end to Henry VIII’s marriage to Katherine of Aragon, the reforms and changes during the1530s and especially the Royal Supremacy and end to taxes paid to Rome changed everything. Regnans in Excelsis under Elizabeth was a declaration of war. The papacy pursued two conflicting policies: support and encouragement for the remaining and often secret supporters on the one hand and ill-conceived schemes for forcible re-conversion, political assassination and foreign invasion on the other. Hope continued into the seventeenth century but the fate of James II convinced Rome that the day was lost.

The cover of Protector Somerset by Jennifer Loach

Protector Somerset

†Jennifer Loach

ISBN 978 1 85944 210 4

First published by Headstart History in 1994 revised edn. The Davenant Press 2001

£4

Edward Seymour (1500-1552) is known as Protector Somerset. He was created Earl of Hertford in 1537 And on the death of Henry VIII he became Lord Protector to the young Edward VI and Duke of Somerset. He owed much to his sister Jane being Henry’s third queen and therefore uncle to the new king. As Protector he attracted problems in his dealings with John Dudley (the future Duke of Northumberland and perhaps the man most responsible for Somerset’s fall from power and subsequent execution) and from his own brother Thomas Seymour who was executed. Religious and economic grievances fuelled rebellions. Whatever these issues Somerset’s determination to rule with his own circle rather than with the Council was the real cause for his downfall. Jennifer Loach offers a re-assessment of the Duke of Somerset.

The cover of John Dudley 1504-1553 by David Loades

John Dudley 1504-1553

Duke of Northumberland: Lord President of the Council

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor,
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 235 7

Revised edition: 2014

£4.99

John Dudley was an efficient, ruthless administrator who struck a sensible balance in England’s foreign policy and did much to remedy the financial crisis which Protector Somerset had left in October 1549. Dudley was ambitious and may well have been responsible for Somerset’s downfall. Although he sought to extend his influence with Edward VI he did not seek the crown matrimonial for his son Guildford through the marriage to Jane Grey. That plan was Edward’s but it was seen as heavily influenced by Dudley and that led to him being seen as a traitor. Dudley’s mistake was to misjudge the mood of the country. Mary was the rightful successor. Dudley wanted to rule through Edward and when Edward died through Jane but that ambition does not justify his reputation as evil.

The cover of The Wyatt Rebellion by David Loades

The Wyatt Rebellion

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor,
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 114 5

First published 2000: Reprint 2015

£4.99

The Wyatt Rebellion was the most serious challenge to Mary I in her five-year reign. The author discusses the motivation of the rebels and their expectations of success. It explains why Wyatt was able to lead 3,000 men to London and why he was thwarted. He was attacked by the Earl of Pembroke’s forces and forced to surrender. Ostensible the whole movement was against Mary’s Spanish marriage and placing Elizabeth on the throne. Investigations were concerned with implicating Elizabeth but there was no evidence. Nevertheless she was imprisoned in the Tower and Wyatt was executed.

The cover of The Dudley Conspiracy by David Loades

The Dudley Conspiracy

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor,
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 104 6

First edition 2001, reprint 2015

£4.99

After her failed pregnancy Mary I’s political position was vulnerable. without an heir the succession went to Elizabeth. The Protestants in Germany, Switzerland and the Rhineland were unequivocal towards Mary regarding her a s a divinely imposed affliction whose ungodly regime could only be endured or evaded. Mary had won the crown by law and Elizabeth could succeed by the same laws and Mary could not disinherit by the same law. David Loades examines the political position in and the motives of Henry Dudley who led implied by Neale and Elton the conspirators. If Elizabeth was secretly encouraging Dudley there was little sign and she was unlikely to encourage those who opposed a rightful queen. What the conspiracy does tell us is that Philip’s position was always contentious.

The cover of The Reign of Philip and Mary by David Loades

The Reign of Philip and Mary

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor,
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 205 0

First published 2001. Revisd edn. 2008

£4.99

The failed attempt to place the Protestant Lady Jane Grey on the throne, Mary Tudor barrier. Having established her government, Mary had two priorities- to define her legal position and to seek a suitable marriage. A husband needed to be of royal blood and irreproachable Catholicism. There were three possible candidates. Mary put the choice in in the hands of the Emperor Charles V and it was decided she should marry Philip. The terms of the treaty which settled the marriage enraged Philip and both he and his courtiers were horrified by the powerless and dishonourable position agreed. His first meeting with Mary was at their wedding in Winchester. He spoke no English. He facilitated the return of Cardinal Pole. The burnings started.. Philip was nevertheless in a difficult position. Much depended on the birth of an heir and Mary claimed to be pregnant. The failure of that pregnancy and Mary’s age weakened his position. His practical help was needed in the Netherlands and against advice, Mary gave him armed assistance. All failed and Mary lost Calais. The Marriage could have been a success but Mary’s attitude to |Philip was one of wifely subservience and wilful defiance. Her death was probably a relief to him.

The cover of A Mid-Tudor Crisis? by Jennifer Loach

A Mid-Tudor Crisis?

†Jennifer Loach

ISBN 978 1 85944 119 0

First published by the Historical Association 1992. 2000 by the Davenant Press. Re-printed 2015.

£4

The author examines the historiography of the concept of a ‘mid-Tudor crisis’ first implied by Neale and Elton and crystallised by Whitney Jones in 1973. She suggests that the mid-Tudor period was one of continuity rather than change. The revolts of 1549 were not caused by starving peasants but economic circumstances or reflected the resistance to religious change. She suggests that the attempt to alter the succession in favour of Jane Grey was a blip, that Foxe’s assessment of Mary’s reign was not reliable and that Mary’s failed pregnancy frustrated Philip’s ambition. Thus the Tudor Monarchy moved with ease from Henry VIII through to Elizabeth.

Jennifer Loach died in 1995 shortly before her fiftieth birthday. She was Fellow of Somerville College, Oxford and University Lecturer She also wrote Protector Somerset for Headstart History/Davenant Press. Reprinting both received the support of Jennifer’s husband Alan Loach.

The cover of Charles V and the Ottomans by David Loades

Charles V and the Ottomans

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor,
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 240 1

Published 2014

£4.00

When Charles V became Holy Roman Emperor in 1519 Hungary was a buffer between Christendom and the Infidel but Hungary was virtually destroyed at the Battle of Mohacs in 1526. In addition the power of Venice in the Adriatic also declined leaving Italy vulnerable to Muslim attacks. The French alliance with the Ottomans in the 1540s allowed the fleets access to Marseilles and threatened Imperial security. Warfare in the Mediterranean became the responsibility of Philip II who had a great victory over the Ottomans at the Battle of Lepanto under the command of Don John of Austria. The victory was ‘more famous than decisive and David Loades shows that in the confrontation between Christendom and the Ottomans in the sixteenth century, the Ottomans won on points.

Seventeenth Century History

The cover of The Levellers and the English Civil War by David Loades

The Levellers and the English Civil War

†David Loades
Professor Emeritus, University of Wales, Bangor,
Hon Member History Faculty, University of Oxford

ISBN 978 1 85944 233 3

Published 2014

£2.99

The Levellers was one of many radical groups produced by the ferment of the English Civil War. Under a Leveller government there would have been no established church, no tithes and no agreed statement of doctrine which in the seventeenth century would have led to chaos. Their ideas were radical, imprecisely formulated and occasionally contradictory. They were feared by the New Model Army for their election of Agitators – shop stewards! But their success laid with the army and it was the army at the time of the Putney Debates that their strength emerged.. The real test of their strength came when the Levellers in the New Model Arm mutinied so normal military discipline was put to the test.. The significance of the skirmish at Burford, Oxfordshire when 400 were captured and imprisoned in the church and three of the were executed and buried in the churchyard. 800 escaped and disappeared into the countryside. Normal discipline had stood that test.

The cover of Radical Religion & the English Civil War by Andrew Bradstock

Radical Religion & the English Civil War

Andrew Bradstock

ISBN 978 1 85944 215 9

£4.00

The 1640s and 50s were among the most turbulent decades in English History. A civil war which divided families and saw the death of thousands, poor harvests and land reforms which took many to the brink of starvation, the removal of longstanding institutions such as the House of Lords and the Established Church and even the execution of the king, Charles I. It is not surprising that people thought that the world was turned upside down. This study looks at the main groups that emerged as people such as the Fifth Monarchists and Muggletonians scarcely remembered today whilst the Diggers and Levellers are still in the public mind. The period also saw flourishing religious movements such as the Baptists and Quakers who rejected the Anglican church and the Ranters who rejected the idea of sin and lived accordingly.

Nineteenth Century History

The cover of The Victorian High Church by J.M.R. Bennett

The Victorian High Church

and the era of the Great Rebellion

J.M.R Bennett

ISBN 978 1 85944 033 6

£5.00

The cover of The Oxford Movement by Nigel Yates

The Oxford Movement

Nigel Yates

ISBN 978 1 85944 154 1

£4.00

Twentieth Century History

The cover of The Versailles Peace Settlement by Antony Lentin

The Versailles Peace Settlement

Antony Lentin

ISBN 978 1 85944 260 7

An Open University text

£4.00

The cover of The Achievements of Charles de Gaulle by Philip Thody

The Achievements of Charles de Gaulle

†Philip Thody
Late Professor of French University of Leeds

ISBN 978 1 85944 153 4

First published by Headstart History in 1990, reprinted 2014 by the Davenant Press.

£4.00

To the English de Gaulle is remembered as the French leader who made broadcasts – Ici Londres - to France during World War II. He is also remembered as the leader who blocked Britain’s entry into the European Union. Professor Thody saw de Gaulle as the first military leader to take power in France and leave his country a more prosperous place, unconquered, not invaded and at peace with its neighbours. He ended the bitter war with Algeria, 1954-1962 and his friendship with the German Chancellor, Konrad Adenauer was crucial in ending the problems between their countries.

Philip Thody died in 1999 and was Professor of French Literature at the University of Leeds for twenty-eight years. After graduating from King’s College, London he moved to Paris to complete his thesis and remained there as lecturer at the Sorbonne. He wrote widely on French literature, politics, history and society

The cover of Karl Marx and British Intellectuals in the 1930s by Jamie Susskind

Karl Marx and British Intellectuals in the 1930s

Jamie Susskind

ISBN 978 1 85944 063 6

£5.00

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Judith Loades